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In this section

Three reviews about the Raven 31 when it was first displayed in Australia.

 

 
Test Reviews of  Raven 31


Design and Cottstruction

The 31s appearance immediately reveals the emphasis on interior space, with the cabin top starting just aft of the bow anchor locker and rising gently all the way back to the relatively small cockpit.

Maximum beam of 3.2 metres (10) is carried aft of amidships, narrowing only slightly to a beamy stern which increases the cockpit size and gains spacious feeling from the incorporation of the rear boarding platform.

Displacement is stated as 3318 kg, with 1425 kg ballast in the long, low aspect keel which draws 1.52 m.

Construction is on a contract basis by Nautec in Auckland, which builds, among other things, four sizes of the Ross production yachts. With no necessity for a light shell for racing, conventional glass fibre lay-up is used for the hull, deck and floor grid, which contains the engine bearers, keel floor and mast step and is glassed into place in the hull.

În New Zealand, the 31 is available for home completion from stage one, which includes hull with floor grid and deck, bonded, windows fitted and hatches supplied. From there on all the bits, from keel to engine and mast to interior timber trim, can be added right up to a sailaway package. In Australia, Raven Yachts intend to market the boat in three stages, from basic hull to lock-up stage with keel and rudder fitted, to full sailaway version.

Anticipating the criticism that NZ boats can be extremely hard to get due to production levels being geared for the local market only, the company says its realistic maximum supply potential for Australia is 10 boats in the first year.

Air Supply, the first Raven 31 and the one I looked over, really had everything that opened and shut down below, this being the full sailaway version. As can be seen in the diagram, the interior is fairly standard for production yachts of 30-36 ft, with twin vee berths in the forward cabin, shower and toilet compartment just aft to port (enclosing the base of the mast) with storage closet opposite, and then the main cabin behind the main bulkheads, which bear the sidestay loads.

The dinette is to port, with seating for four adults and convertible to a double berth, with the single settee berth opposite. Behind half bulkheads the galley to port and navigation station  incorporating the freezer to starboard with the seating for the navigation table provided for by the forward end of the double quarter berth

are the shaped galley to port and navigation station incorporating the freezer to starboard, with seating at the nav table provided on the forward end of the double quarter berth. Use of New Guinea wałnut throughout can only be described as lavish and with the soft furnishings the result is very stylish and warm. Timber on future 3 is will be kauri with mahogany as an option. The great attention to interior finish is in line with the high standard Australian buyers have come to expect of the New Zealand production cruiser racers. It was no surprise when Owen Woolley declared: I don't like glass interiors”

There is full standing headroom and while there is no headliner, The interior is spray painted with through the deck and cabin top sealed off and no dangerous edges apparent. (The company planned to develop a timber headliner for future boats.)

The galley includes a small icebox, deep food storage bin, sink, Roden twin burner stove and oven, high fids around all bench tops, cupboard space and storage shelves for plates and mugs. A cutlery drawer is included on the underside of the dinette table, which is on a raised section of floor housing storage space. The water storage tank of 200 litres (45 gal) is housed under the starboard settee.








The Yanmar 15 diesel is housed in the usual spot aft of the companionway, with the steps lifting out of the way for access, Fuel tank capacity is 90 litres (20 gal.

All up, this interior a lot to fit into a 9 .45 m yacht, and it could quite easily prove a popular gathering spot for visitors from next-door boats during the Christmas cruise or whatever,

The Raven 31s rig is modest, with the intention being to provide sails and gear that can be handled without dramas by a couple, who may also have a child or two to keep an eye on at the same time. A fractional rig has been opted for in the name of flexibility; the sail away version comes with No 3 blade head sail which can be set up with self-tacking gear on the foredeck, although the Raven people seem to be rather against this, in the belief that self-tacking tracks can trip unsuspecting crew or guests (hence the name cow catcher),

Working around one basic luff length for all head sails, other genoas developed for the boat by the Auckland Lidgard are 150°, 130°

and 90°. Halyards and sail control lines are all led back to clutch jammers on the cabin top ahead of winches, with one more pair of winches on the cockpit coamings for head sail , The coamings are very wide and comfortable for lounging about in the cockpit with up to six adults. The port cockpit seat houses the large sail

Good ideas don't take long to travel around the boat building industry; the boarding platforms detachable transom door concept as seen on the Farr 1020 and Young 88 among others is incorporated successfully here for easy boarding, diving or fishing. Raven Yachts also intends to convert the main sheet traveller, at present fixed in position across the cockpit, to a slideaway version clearing the cockpit of obstructions while at anchor, as has been done so well on the Wright 10 (also new at the Sydney Boatshow).

Non-skid surfacing is good on all deck surfaces. The side decks are narrow but provide adequate access to the foredeck, with grab rails within easy reach.

Summary

Though its impossible to make conclusions about a yacht without having a good sail of it, it would seem on first impressions that the Raven 31 could be another proposition worth consideration by buyers looking for a lot of interior comfort on a compact yacht that is easy to handle, without being too fussed about racing.

In New Zealand, Raven Yachts really has a ready-made market for the 31 --- Raven 26 owners happy with their boats, but seeking to gain just that extra room and performance. This is indicated by the fact that 19 orders had been placed for the 31 before the first one hit the water.

Colin Gestro comments that there is also interest from people looking at the Farr 1020 racercruiser and wondering if they can afford that extra length, while he says that people interested in quick boats like the Young 88 and Ross 930 don't give his boat a second glance.

it would seem, though, that the main opposition on the Australian market could come from slightly bigger boats like the Sydney-Northshore 33 or another new Kiwi product, the Wright 10. While holding the potential for more performance for club racing,both also offer a lot of family cruising comfort. Ah, the difficult choices we have to make if we want to throw money at a yacht . . . This is one for the cruisers, but not the racers, to consider.



PROVING THE PEDIGREE

EVE always believed the most contented yachtsman is the one who, before buying a boat, carefully considers the use to which it will be put. No one. is more frustrated than, a person with competitive Spirit trying to nurse a cruiser around an Olympic course.

So perhaps the best way to start this report is to outline why Bruce Robertson bought his Raven 31 The Stoned Crow, because his experience and the demands he makes of his yacht will not be unique.

Previously owner of the Raven 26 Barbarella, Bruce saw the Raven 31 as a logical progression when the time came to move up. The boat had only recently become available and was from the same designer as the smaller 26.

Robertson wanted his new boat to be primarily a safe family cruiser. It had to be stiff so as not to wear out the crew while cruising, and of enough displacement that

the added weight of scuba diving gear would not affect it too much. Speed was not important, though the boat had to sail well and the class to which it belonged had to provide close racing.

Hull

The Raven 31 (9,45m) is a moderate displacement (3318kg, 7316lb) cruiser designed to be handled by one person with a little help — such as a family cruise often demands. The sections are full from the bow aft to contribute room and load-carrying ability. The topsides are high, again to contribute room, but this does not hinder cruising because a wide transom platform and



Fuel capacity: 80 litres (17.6gal)

Water capacity: 200 litres (44gal) Engine: Recommended 15hp saildrive Price: Factory finished sailaway 74,364. Home completion 54,493. The Stoned Crow was fitted with numerous extras, bringing the price to 83,000. Designer: Owen Woolley.


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SEASPRAY – January, 198



The beam is carried well aft, the stern being only marginally narrower than maximum beam. Again, this helps to contribute room to the accommodation,

The designer comments: There are few other boats around like this. We felt it would fill a need for those who wanted a forgiving boat.

It is not light displacement because we wanted a boat that would sail when the wind  got up

Cruising people expect things like a deep freeze, plenty of water, comfortable appointments and a motor, and all these things add weight. The 31 is a moderate displacement boat so we can make it more comfortable. A cruising boat should also be fun while getting around at a reasonable speed

}construction

The Raven 31 has a solid fibreglass hull with foam sandwich deck. The moulding is by Nautec Yachts. In common with most production boatbuilders, Nautec will mot reveal exact details of laminates, but we can tell you that the basic hull laminate is chopped strand mat with two f

layers of 240z woven rowings. There are extra layers of cloth in the bottom, particularly around the : keel area. - .

An internal structural grid, from chopped strand mat and woven rowings, strength so the hull. The grid has two forward and one amidships ring frames, and five floors as well as fore and aft stiffening, Solid engine beams are laminated into the grid beneath the mast step, in the keel area and as engine beds.

The grid is bedded down on filler and then glassed to the hull. The grid provides locating points for bulkheads and interior joinery — important for amateur builders fitting out the boat themselves. The grid also has an engine drip tray and shelves beneath the galley and starboard cupboard.

The deck laminate is gunstock and two layers of woven rowings either side of a 15mm Divinycell foam core, Plywood pads replace the foam underdeck fitting attachment points, either side of the companionway, and in the cockpit coaming tops where the Winches are mounted.

Flanges moulded into the hull and deck provide means by which they are joined. The join is epoxied, the inside fibreglassed and to finish the join the toe rail is attached through the flange.

New Zealand Yachts own the moulds to the Raven. The company contracts Nautec to laminate the hulls and decks, and can supply the boat at any stage from here to finished yacht. Finished yachts are mostly fitted out by Owen Woolley.

The keel is solid lead, weighing 1425kg (31421b) and shallow to help keep the draught moderate. Six silicon bronze bolts hold it to the boat.

Deck layout

As befits a cruising yacht, the deck layout is simple. We particularly liked the fact that the shrouds are anchored to the cabin top, far enough inboard to pass without gymnastic manoeuvring. The cabin top comprises most of the deck area, carried forward in a chisel shape to the bow to maximize headroom below. This leaves a large amount of working area and gets rid of the slippery forward end of the cabin prominent on many boats tested in the past.

The Raven has the now traditional open transom with boarding platform, a must for coastal cruising. Lifelines and a washboard separate the boarding platform from the cockpit at Sea, but are quickly removed.

The cockpit is cleverly designed with a narrow centre well and seats and very wide coaming. The top of the coamings make good seats in the light and are high enough to offer protection from the weather. Bins under make good storage for odds and ends. The Stoned Crows cockpit sole and seats are teak laid (an extra) and the coaming tops covered with moulded nonslip, The mainsheet track slides into the coaming to make the cockpit walk through at anchor.

Six Cleveco winches are fitted, a pair each of 24 primaries, 22 secondaries and on the



Top: Hulls are laid up at Nautec Yachts and finished by whoever the owner specifies. Above: A structural grid reinforces the hull and provides bulkhead and furniture locating points for home construction. Left: The Raven 31 shares the same concept and similar styling to its smaller sister, the popular Raven 26. Right: Deck layout is simple and the chisel shaped cabin top provides a safe working area.

cabin top either side of the companionway, 18s for halyards and sail controls.

Sail controls are led aft to a brace of Easylock jammers either side of the cockpit, and during races someone could operate these while standing at the top of the companionway steps. It also makes things easier when cruising because the crew member responsible does not have to go forward to adjust the controls.

The number one genoa sheets to the side decks aft, the number two to the aft outside edge of the cabin top, and the self-tacker about 203mm (8.in) inside the edge of the cabin top, either side of the mast. With this configuration the obvious way to go forward is along the side deck with the teak grab rail on the coachroof and lifelines falling to hand, and to step on to the low cabin top forward.

The only things on the foredeck are the spinnaker pole, RC Marine CF7250 forehatch, the anchor hatch and mooring boilard. The bollard is a good one, but there are no fairleads. On a cruising boat we believe these are a must because bow rollers are susceptible to being damaged by the anchor warp if the boat is anchored in heavy weather.

There is a good-sized anchor well with a single hinged lid. There is no catch on the lid and were it our boat, wed have one fitted for peace of mind. Pulpit, stanchions and lifelines are Sparloft and all deck gear RC Marine,

Rig

The single-spreader mast is fractionally rigged and keel stepped. The Stoned Crows

SEA SPRAY – January, 1985


The toilet compartment is to port, aft of the forward cabin, and has a Brydon Boy unit. All plumbing is from RC marine. Also in the compartment are a bench and basin with a single foot-operated freshwater pump for the tap. Stowage is provided behind and under the basin, with good access to the plumbing behind in the cupboards. The toilet base is part of a moulded unit which includes a sump for the shower. The plumbing for the shower is also fitted, should the owner want

The saloon has a Ushaped settee and table to port and single berth to starboard. The table drops to form a double berth. The table mounting is a Sparloft product and is one of the best we have seen, sturdy, easy to operate, and reluctant to trap fingers. There are no fiddles on the table and while we believe that decentralized fiddles (an inch high at least) are necessary On a table, we accept that they complicate use of a table as a bed base,

To starboard of companion way is the chart table, good-sized with capacity beneath

Top: The saloon has three berths when the table is dropped as it is in this photo, Carpet on the floor and interior fabric lining cover exposed fibreglass surfaces. Below left: The forward cabin has two berths, stowage for clothes in the focsle and for gear underberths.

is a Sparloft SP145. Masts are optional with five different companies sections to choose from in the class rules. The forestay, capshrouds, single lower shrouds and backstay are all wire and no runners are fitted. The backstay is adjustable through a : I purchase. Headsails are hanked, and although class rules allow Twinfoils, they do not allow two sails to be set from the Twinfoil for races. They are allowed in the rules to give owners the option of setting twin headsails downwind while cruising.

The rig is simple and sail areas moderate to make handling simple. The main is 22m? (237sq ft) and number one genoa 27m? (291 sq ft). The working jib has been designed as a self-tacker for cruising, the boat being able to carry the sail over a wide SEA SPRAY – January, 1985

Below right: The galley has plenty of worktop, food and utensil storage.

No sailcloth

range of wind strengths. restrictions are in the class rules.

Interior

Berths are provided for seven people with a twin Vberth in the forward cabin, double and single settee berths in the saloon, and a double quarter berth to starboard.

Owen Woolley has made a particular effort to increase headroom wherever possible. The cabin top and floor grid sloping 51mm (2in) helps forward headroom considerably.

With generous freeboard and beam, the Raven has good appointments. The interior is well-lit with the large forehatch, a smaller RC Marine hatch over the saloon, windows and companionway. At night the 12-volt system takes over.

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29


The electrical switchgear, chart reading light, Belcom VHF and engine controls are mounted next to the table. The navigator sits on the front of the quarter berth. The freezer is beneath the chart table with the cold stuff coming from a compressor on the motor.

To port of the companionway is the galley, with two athwart ship benches and a Mariner Princess stove gimball mounted against the hull. The Stoned Crows sink, with manually operated fresh and salt water pumps, is on the aft bench but more recent models have the sink moved to the forward bench, Food stowage and a chillybin are accessible through lids in the worktop.

Plate stowage is in racks on the aft bulkhead and there is storage for less breakable items under both benches. Gear stowage is well provided for throughout the boat. There is a sizeable cupboard for clothes and linen in the forepeak, and another on the starboard side opposite the toilet compartment.

The cutlery draw and a toolkit are under the saloon table. Behind the settee backs are more stowage areas.

We particularly like the big sail bin under the port cockpit seat. On The Stoned Crow it serves as gear and sail stowage and has a mounting for the 2hp Johnson auxiliary, There is even a light for night-time.

Gas bottles are mounted in this area under the sidedeck. The bilge pump, mounted in the stowage bin, has a long hose which

reaches all parts of the boat. The pump is operated from the cockpit well and drains through a skinfitting on the transom below the boarding platform.

The water tank, a plasticwelded version, holds 200 litres (44 gal) and is under the starboard settee. The fuel tank, holding 80 litres (17.6gal) is beneath the cockpit sole.

The cabin top is trimmed on the inside by kauri or rimu and though this is an extra, most boats have had it fitted, To further cover the fibreglass, Bruce Robertson has had the exposed interior surfaces finished with Front Runner synthetic fabric.

Auxiliary

Without doubt the installation of The Stoned Crows Yanmar 3GMC (22.) three-cylinder diesel is the best we have seen on a test boat. Excellent soundproofing keeps the noise to a whisper and sets a standard others should follow. Geoff Ellis did the installation and the engine is in fact bigger than the standard 5hp recommended.

Performance

We had good conditions for our sail with wind from 15 to 18 knots, the occasional gust to 20, and bright sun. The boat carried the number one genoa initially but was overpressed and rounded up in the gusts. With the number two, the Raven was better balanced.

This boat is not going to be a scorching

performer but will slog it out through most conditions, reeling off the miles in a steady manner. The motion was steady.

The helm was heavy and when overpressed the rudder lost its bite when the tiller was up under the helmsmans chin. We also found ourselves sliding down the coaming top in the cockpit when the boat heeled heavily. We must stress here, though, that The Stoned Crows rig was not raked far enough aft — it had not been tuned fully when we had our Saif. With it raked further aft the performance of the rudder would be considerably different. Theo Perry from Raven yachts, who has sailed his own Raven 31 to Fiji and Sydney through calms and storms, stresses that this is the case. With the rig properly tuned and the sails set proper. ly, he says, the helm is neutral and is vely well balanced. Since our test The Stoned Crows mast has been raked aft 18in — too short a forestay was the problem.

Conclusion

The .(26ft) Raven, predecessor of this new boat, is one of the countrys most popular cruising boats. Around 150 have been built and they have had in the region of 800 owners,

The new Raven follows the same concept as its smaller sister. Aimed at the cruising market, particularly cruising families, it offers a simple no fuss yacht at a reasonable price.

 


The Raven 31 is another of those new boats on the market which made its Australian debut at the 1984 Sydney Boat Show. It is also another wellbuilt New Zealand fractional rigged yacht though the emphasis is biased more towards cruising than racing, thus the manufacturers avoid the ubiquitous label cruiser racer” preferring the description family cruiser.

The Raven 26 designed by Owen Woolley 15 years ago has proven a

great success in New Zealand with a strong association boasting some 120 boats. The 26 featured a flush deck and comfortable accommodation, and was definitely aimed at family cruising. The Raven 31, also designed by Woolley some 18 months ago was the direct result of input from Raven 26 owners who were looking to move up in size. The 31-footer does not have a flush deck, though it has a wide cabin trunk to give plenty of interior space, and it features a fractional rig, and boarding platform with removable transom.

Bob Tyrrell, the Australian agent for Raven Yachts, said Woolley had aimed at designing a family cruising boat with lots of room and the capability of making quick passages. Cruising considerations always came first, however, if there was a conflict of interest.

"For example, the fin keel is longer than normal to provide extra directional stability while the quite deep V Sections up for


ward contribute towards this. There is also a 50 per cent ballast ratio 50 the boat is very stiff. At the same tinue Woolley felt he could away without a skeg.

his emphasis on family cruiser is not to imply the Raven 31 is tisraris a harbour sailer. In fact, this iis rät om display al the Boat , Cool Change, was cruised sew Zealand to Australia, via ## 1 isoaking up about 4000 miles. It was it very clever marketing ploy to ia in the vessels credentials as a worthy cruising boat and boat buyers that the Raven can also be considered as a long distance yacht, rather than just for coastal cruising.

Design

The Ravens longish keel translates into a 1.52m draft with 1425kg of ballast and an overall displacement of 3318kg. It has a long waterline of .84m (29ft), and with its fairly modest beam of 3.2m carried weil aft, the Raven 31 should perform well on downwind legs.

The boat gains its interior space from a wide coach roof which slopes forward virtually all the way to anchor capstan and manages to give the boat a sleek profile while not compromising the interior,

Construction

The Raven 31 is of conventional fibreglass construction using

chopped Strand mat and woven rovings on the hull with the deck of foam sandwich using Klegecell. An internal grid is glassed in and runs the full length of the vessel giving both longitudinal and transverse reinforcement. Inside the grid are timber blocks at extra stress points such as the mast step, keel bolts and engine bed. Plywood blocks are also incorporated in the deck in areas of compression such as where the winches are located, The is available three stages to Australian boatbuyers: stage one is huli and deck bonded with alloy toe rails, hatches, keel, rudder and tiller fitted — and windows supplied (25,416); stage two additions include a Yanmar 15hp engine, kauri bulkheads and fitout, water tank and coaming line fitted (41,442); and stage three includes sails and spars, standing and running rigging, deck gear, pumps and electrics (55,890). (See box for full details),

Deck and rig

With its wide coamings, stowaway traveller track, and removable transom, the Raven 31 cockpit proved both comfortable and functional. The boarding platform, first seen on the Young 88 and Farr 1020 (both Kiwi yachts), is an excellent idea of the cruising lifestyle: swimming. getting out of dinghies and it rading provisions from a dinghy all become very easy with this plation. The traveller track slides i ti , a tube in the port are olovi ti ,

Stowage is in the port seat locker where the is enough space for sails, gas , and fenders, Genoa vvint les on Cool Change were two Maxwell 23s while the winches for the halyards were Barlow 20 and mounted on the Cabin top.

All halyards led back to this position and were controlled by a

Cruising Helmsman's CRUISING BOATS – 11

bevy of jammers. The companionway hatch is trimmed in attractive karri and the timber surrounding for attaching the dodger combined with the timber grab rails, break up the starkness of a fibreglass deck,

Up the bow is a single anchor bollard with a brass capstan and, on Cool Change, an electric winch system. This was installed in anticipation of the South Pacific cruising the boat would be doing before reaching Sydney and the need for all chain rode.

The sloping foredeck and narrow side decks may sometimes make sail changes and deck work generally a bit awkward, but the Raven has good non-skid surface and an easily managed rig to counteract any of these problems. The genoa tracks situated on the side decks are complemented by another set on the coach roof to permit better sheeting angles for windward work and for smaller headsails when the wind pipes up,

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interior

Woolleys above decks compromises pay off down below on the Raven 31 where there is considerable room with a double quarter and chart table to starboard and a Ushaped galley to port. The dinette converts to another double barth which combined with the twin Vee-berths and single settee berth gives sleeping for seven people. Realistically it provides living space for a couple and two children, or two couples.

One good idea worth mentioning is the mast base is enclosed in the head so the inevitable leaks at the collar are not going to matter. Opposite the head is a hanging locker,

The main saloon has the usual stowage under the berths with the 200 litre water tank located under the starboard settee. The galley also has good stowage with two vertical lockers and the ice box under the chart table opposite. There are both hand and foot pumps in the galley, and a two burner Mariner stove and oven,

The Yanmar 15hp engine is located in the conventional place with access through the companionway steps. The stainless steel fuel tank has a capacity of 3G .

Cárange was attractively fitted out in New Zealand kauri though there are teak and mahogany options. Another nice touch is the timber headliner which again is kauri is pleasant.

Ventilation throughout the boat was through a large hatch forward, a medium sized hatch amidships and a mushroom vent over the

Performance

Coo! Changes owner, Alf Goad is

an experienced ocean racing yachtsman having done a number of Sydney-Hobart, Sydney-Noumea and Lord Howe races as well as the regular season racing calendar. He bought the stav en 31 because the idea of a cruising boat which had a fair turn of speed" appealed to him.

Since he took over the boat after the boat show he has sailed it regularly and said he cannot fault its performance.

"We sailed Change up from the harbour to Pittwater in 35 knots and averaged over % knots reaching, then when it swung onto our nose, we were doing % knots, he said,

We had up a No 3 headsail and the boat was heeling 15 degrees.” For the test we sailed Change in a breeze which began at nothing but picked up to 13-15 knots, Notable with llll: Raven was that when there was a puff, the boat accelerated very quickly, With sheets eased in () knots of breeze we were doing .5 knots which reached eigli i at the maximum 15 knots Bolling into the 15 knot wind were averaging seven knots.

The tillering was very easy and it was all exceptionally pleasing experience steering the Raven in the increasing breeze. The Raven has a great deal to offer the novice sailor who missed out on learning to sail in dinghies. Because it responds So well to the helm, and to tweaking, one can easily comprehend the cause and effects of tuning, and because of its modest rig the boat is not intimidating. Yet it's light displacement and quick acceleration promises rewards for doing the right things when sailing the boat,

Under power Change also benefited from its easily driven hull and cruised happily at Six knots at maximum revs for the Yanmar 15hp. Summary

The Raven 31 is 55,890 at stage three and with a list of optional extras, it probably brings the cost of a boat ready for Cruising to about 60,000. For that you would get a versatile vessel which can be sailed short handed but which also would be fun sailing in club races. At the same time you would have a comfortable boat which is capable of long distance or coastal Cruising.


The Raven 31 is another of those new boats on the market which made its Australian debut at the 1984 Sydney Boat Show. It is also another wellbuilt New Zealand fractional rigged yacht though the emphasis is biased more towards cruising than racing, thus the manufacturers avoid the ubiquitous label cruiser racer” preferring the description family cruiser.

The Raven 26 designed by Owen Woolley 15 years ago has proven a

great success in New Zealand with a strong association boasting some 120 boats. The 26 featured a flush deck and comfortable accommodation, and was definitely aimed at family cruising. The Raven 31, also designed by Woolley some 18 months ago was the direct result of input from Raven 26 owners who were looking to move up in size. The 31-footer does not have a flush deck, though it has a wide cabin trunk to give plenty of interior space, and it features a fractional rig, and boarding platform with removable transom.

Bob Tyrrell, the Australian agent for Raven Yachts, said Woolley had aimed at designing a family cruising boat with lots of room and the capability of making quick passages. Cruising considerations always came first, however, if there was a conflict of interest.

"For example, the fin keel is longer than normal to provide extra directional stability while the quite deep V Sections up for


ward contribute towards this. There is also a 50 per cent ballast ratio 50 the boat is very stiff. At the same tinue Woolley felt he could away without a skeg.

his emphasis on family cruiser is not to imply the Raven 31 is tisraris a harbour sailer. In fact, this iis rät om display al the Boat , Cool Change, was cruised sew Zealand to Australia, via ## 1 isoaking up about 4000 miles. It was it very clever marketing ploy to ia in the vessels credentials as a worthy cruising boat and boat buyers that the Raven can also be considered as a long distance yacht, rather than just for coastal cruising.

Design

The Ravens longish keel translates into a 1.52m draft with 1425kg of ballast and an overall displacement of 3318kg. It has a long waterline of .84m (29ft), and with its fairly modest beam of 3.2m carried weil aft, the Raven 31 should perform well on downwind legs.

The boat gains its interior space from a wide coach roof which slopes forward virtually all the way to anchor capstan and manages to give the boat a sleek profile while not compromising the interior,

Construction

The Raven 31 is of conventional fibreglass construction using

chopped Strand mat and woven rovings on the hull with the deck of foam sandwich using Klegecell. An internal grid is glassed in and runs the full length of the vessel giving both longitudinal and transverse reinforcement. Inside the grid are timber blocks at extra stress points such as the mast step, keel bolts and engine bed. Plywood blocks are also incorporated in the deck in areas of compression such as where the winches are located, The is available three stages to Australian boatbuyers: stage one is huli and deck bonded with alloy toe rails, hatches, keel, rudder and tiller fitted — and windows supplied (25,416); stage two additions include a Yanmar 15hp engine, kauri bulkheads and fitout, water tank and coaming line fitted (41,442); and stage three includes sails and spars, standing and running rigging, deck gear, pumps and electrics (55,890). (See box for full details),

Deck and rig

With its wide coamings, stowaway traveller track, and removable transom, the Raven 31 cockpit proved both comfortable and functional. The boarding platform, first seen on the Young 88 and Farr 1020 (both Kiwi yachts), is an excellent idea of the cruising lifestyle: swimming. getting out of dinghies and it rading provisions from a dinghy all become very easy with this plation. The traveller track slides i ti , a tube in the port are olovi ti ,

Stowage is in the port seat locker where the is enough space for sails, gas , and fenders, Genoa vvint les on Cool Change were two Maxwell 23s while the winches for the halyards were Barlow 20 and mounted on the Cabin top.

All halyards led back to this position and were controlled by a

Cruising Helmsman's CRUISING BOATS – 11

bevy of jammers. The companionway hatch is trimmed in attractive karri and the timber surrounding for attaching the dodger combined with the timber grab rails, break up the starkness of a fibreglass deck,

Up the bow is a single anchor bollard with a brass capstan and, on Cool Change, an electric winch system. This was installed in anticipation of the South Pacific cruising the boat would be doing before reaching Sydney and the need for all chain rode.

The sloping foredeck and narrow side decks may sometimes make sail changes and deck work generally a bit awkward, but the Raven has good non-skid surface and an easily managed rig to counteract any of these problems. The genoa tracks situated on the side decks are complemented by another set on the coach roof to permit better sheeting angles for windward work and for smaller headsails when the wind pipes up,

Empty page scroll down for more


interior

Woolleys above decks compromises pay off down below on the Raven 31 where there is considerable room with a double quarter and chart table to starboard and a Ushaped galley to port. The dinette converts to another double barth which combined with the twin Vee-berths and single settee berth gives sleeping for seven people. Realistically it provides living space for a couple and two children, or two couples.

One good idea worth mentioning is the mast base is enclosed in the head so the inevitable leaks at the collar are not going to matter. Opposite the head is a hanging locker,

The main saloon has the usual stowage under the berths with the 200 litre water tank located under the starboard settee. The galley also has good stowage with two vertical lockers and the ice box under the chart table opposite. There are both hand and foot pumps in the galley, and a two burner Mariner stove and oven,

The Yanmar 15hp engine is located in the conventional place with access through the companionway steps. The stainless steel fuel tank has a capacity of 3G .

Cárange was attractively fitted out in New Zealand kauri though there are teak and mahogany options. Another nice touch is the timber headliner which again is kauri is pleasant.

Ventilation throughout the boat was through a large hatch forward, a medium sized hatch amidships and a mushroom vent over the

Performance

Coo! Changes owner, Alf Goad is

an experienced ocean racing yachtsman having done a number of Sydney-Hobart, Sydney-Noumea and Lord Howe races as well as the regular season racing calendar. He bought the stav en 31 because the idea of a cruising boat which had a fair turn of speed" appealed to him.

Since he took over the boat after the boat show he has sailed it regularly and said he cannot fault its performance.

"We sailed Change up from the harbour to Pittwater in 35 knots and averaged over % knots reaching, then when it swung onto our nose, we were doing % knots, he said,

We had up a No 3 headsail and the boat was heeling 15 degrees.” For the test we sailed Change in a breeze which began at nothing but picked up to 13-15 knots, Notable with llll: Raven was that when there was a puff, the boat accelerated very quickly, With sheets eased in () knots of breeze we were doing .5 knots which reached eigli i at the maximum 15 knots Bolling into the 15 knot wind were averaging seven knots.

The tillering was very easy and it was all exceptionally pleasing experience steering the Raven in the increasing breeze. The Raven has a great deal to offer the novice sailor who missed out on learning to sail in dinghies. Because it responds So well to the helm, and to tweaking, one can easily comprehend the cause and effects of tuning, and because of its modest rig the boat is not intimidating. Yet it's light displacement and quick acceleration promises rewards for doing the right things when sailing the boat,

Under power Change also benefited from its easily driven hull and cruised happily at Six knots at maximum revs for the Yanmar 15hp. Summary

The Raven 31 is 55,890 at stage three and with a list of optional extras, it probably brings the cost of a boat ready for Cruising to about 60,000. For that you would get a versatile vessel which can be sailed short handed but which also would be fun sailing in club races. At the same time you would have a comfortable boat which is capable of long distance or coastal Cruising.

 


The Raven 31 is another of those new boats on the market which made its Australian debut at the 1984 Sydney Boat Show. It is also another wellbuilt New Zealand fractional rigged yacht though the emphasis is biased more towards cruising than racing, thus the manufacturers avoid the ubiquitous label cruiser racer” preferring the description family cruiser.

The Raven 26 designed by Owen Woolley 15 years ago has proven a

great success in New Zealand with a strong association boasting some 120 boats. The 26 featured a flush deck and comfortable accommodation, and was definitely aimed at family cruising. The Raven 31, also designed by Woolley some 18 months ago was the direct result of input from Raven 26 owners who were looking to move up in size. The 31-footer does not have a flush deck, though it has a wide cabin trunk to give plenty of interior space, and it features a fractional rig, and boarding platform with removable transom.

Bob Tyrrell, the Australian agent for Raven Yachts, said Woolley had aimed at designing a family cruising boat with lots of room and the capability of making quick passages. Cruising considerations always came first, however, if there was a conflict of interest.

"For example, the fin keel is longer than normal to provide extra directional stability while the quite deep V Sections up for


ward contribute towards this. There is also a 50 per cent ballast ratio 50 the boat is very stiff. At the same tinue Woolley felt he could away without a skeg.

his emphasis on family cruiser is not to imply the Raven 31 is tisraris a harbour sailer. In fact, this iis rät om display al the Boat , Cool Change, was cruised sew Zealand to Australia, via ## 1 isoaking up about 4000 miles. It was it very clever marketing ploy to ia in the vessels credentials as a worthy cruising boat and boat buyers that the Raven can also be considered as a long distance yacht, rather than just for coastal cruising.

Design

The Ravens longish keel translates into a 1.52m draft with 1425kg of ballast and an overall displacement of 3318kg. It has a long waterline of .84m (29ft), and with its fairly modest beam of 3.2m carried weil aft, the Raven 31 should perform well on downwind legs.

The boat gains its interior space from a wide coach roof which slopes forward virtually all the way to anchor capstan and manages to give the boat a sleek profile while not compromising the interior,

Construction

The Raven 31 is of conventional fibreglass construction using

chopped Strand mat and woven rovings on the hull with the deck of foam sandwich using Klegecell. An internal grid is glassed in and runs the full length of the vessel giving both longitudinal and transverse reinforcement. Inside the grid are timber blocks at extra stress points such as the mast step, keel bolts and engine bed. Plywood blocks are also incorporated in the deck in areas of compression such as where the winches are located, The is available three stages to Australian boatbuyers: stage one is huli and deck bonded with alloy toe rails, hatches, keel, rudder and tiller fitted — and windows supplied (25,416); stage two additions include a Yanmar 15hp engine, kauri bulkheads and fitout, water tank and coaming line fitted (41,442); and stage three includes sails and spars, standing and running rigging, deck gear, pumps and electrics (55,890). (See box for full details),

Deck and rig

With its wide coamings, stowaway traveller track, and removable transom, the Raven 31 cockpit proved both comfortable and functional. The boarding platform, first seen on the Young 88 and Farr 1020 (both Kiwi yachts), is an excellent idea of the cruising lifestyle: swimming. getting out of dinghies and it rading provisions from a dinghy all become very easy with this plation. The traveller track slides i ti , a tube in the port are olovi ti ,

Stowage is in the port seat locker where the is enough space for sails, gas , and fenders, Genoa vvint les on Cool Change were two Maxwell 23s while the winches for the halyards were Barlow 20 and mounted on the Cabin top.

All halyards led back to this position and were controlled by a

Cruising Helmsman's CRUISING BOATS – 11

bevy of jammers. The companionway hatch is trimmed in attractive karri and the timber surrounding for attaching the dodger combined with the timber grab rails, break up the starkness of a fibreglass deck,

Up the bow is a single anchor bollard with a brass capstan and, on Cool Change, an electric winch system. This was installed in anticipation of the South Pacific cruising the boat would be doing before reaching Sydney and the need for all chain rode.

The sloping foredeck and narrow side decks may sometimes make sail changes and deck work generally a bit awkward, but the Raven has good non-skid surface and an easily managed rig to counteract any of these problems. The genoa tracks situated on the side decks are complemented by another set on the coach roof to permit better sheeting angles for windward work and for smaller headsails when the wind pipes up,

Empty page scroll down for more


interior

Woolleys above decks compromises pay off down below on the Raven 31 where there is considerable room with a double quarter and chart table to starboard and a Ushaped galley to port. The dinette converts to another double barth which combined with the twin Vee-berths and single settee berth gives sleeping for seven people. Realistically it provides living space for a couple and two children, or two couples.

One good idea worth mentioning is the mast base is enclosed in the head so the inevitable leaks at the collar are not going to matter. Opposite the head is a hanging locker,

The main saloon has the usual stowage under the berths with the 200 litre water tank located under the starboard settee. The galley also has good stowage with two vertical lockers and the ice box under the chart table opposite. There are both hand and foot pumps in the galley, and a two burner Mariner stove and oven,

The Yanmar 15hp engine is located in the conventional place with access through the companionway steps. The stainless steel fuel tank has a capacity of 3G .

Cárange was attractively fitted out in New Zealand kauri though there are teak and mahogany options. Another nice touch is the timber headliner which again is kauri is pleasant.

Ventilation throughout the boat was through a large hatch forward, a medium sized hatch amidships and a mushroom vent over the

Performance

Coo! Changes owner, Alf Goad is

an experienced ocean racing yachtsman having done a number of Sydney-Hobart, Sydney-Noumea and Lord Howe races as well as the regular season racing calendar. He bought the stav en 31 because the idea of a cruising boat which had a fair turn of speed" appealed to him.

Since he took over the boat after the boat show he has sailed it regularly and said he cannot fault its performance.

"We sailed Change up from the harbour to Pittwater in 35 knots and averaged over % knots reaching, then when it swung onto our nose, we were doing % knots, he said,

We had up a No 3 headsail and the boat was heeling 15 degrees.” For the test we sailed Change in a breeze which began at nothing but picked up to 13-15 knots, Notable with llll: Raven was that when there was a puff, the boat accelerated very quickly, With sheets eased in () knots of breeze we were doing .5 knots which reached eigli i at the maximum 15 knots Bolling into the 15 knot wind were averaging seven knots.

The tillering was very easy and it was all exceptionally pleasing experience steering the Raven in the increasing breeze. The Raven has a great deal to offer the novice sailor who missed out on learning to sail in dinghies. Because it responds So well to the helm, and to tweaking, one can easily comprehend the cause and effects of tuning, and because of its modest rig the boat is not intimidating. Yet it's light displacement and quick acceleration promises rewards for doing the right things when sailing the boat,

Under power Change also benefited from its easily driven hull and cruised happily at Six knots at maximum revs for the Yanmar 15hp. Summary

The Raven 31 is 55,890 at stage three and with a list of optional extras, it probably brings the cost of a boat ready for Cruising to about 60,000. For that you would get a versatile vessel which can be sailed short handed but which also would be fun sailing in club races. At the same time you would have a comfortable boat which is capable of long distance or coastal Cruising.


The Raven 31 is another of those new boats on the market which made its Australian debut at the 1984 Sydney Boat Show. It is also another wellbuilt New Zealand fractional rigged yacht though the emphasis is biased more towards cruising than racing, thus the manufacturers avoid the ubiquitous label cruiser racer” preferring the description family cruiser.

The Raven 26 designed by Owen Woolley 15 years ago has proven a

great success in New Zealand with a strong association boasting some 120 boats. The 26 featured a flush deck and comfortable accommodation, and was definitely aimed at family cruising. The Raven 31, also designed by Woolley some 18 months ago was the direct result of input from Raven 26 owners who were looking to move up in size. The 31-footer does not have a flush deck, though it has a wide cabin trunk to give plenty of interior space, and it features a fractional rig, and boarding platform with removable transom.

Bob Tyrrell, the Australian agent for Raven Yachts, said Woolley had aimed at designing a family cruising boat with lots of room and the capability of making quick passages. Cruising considerations always came first, however, if there was a conflict of interest.

"For example, the fin keel is longer than normal to provide extra directional stability while the quite deep V Sections up for


ward contribute towards this. There is also a 50 per cent ballast ratio 50 the boat is very stiff. At the same tinue Woolley felt he could away without a skeg.

his emphasis on family cruiser is not to imply the Raven 31 is only a harbour sailer. In fact, this  rät boat on display al the Boat , Cool Change, was cruised New Zealand to Australia, via Vanuatui soaking up about 4000 miles. It was it very clever marketing ploy to ia in the vessels credentials as a worthy cruising boat and boat buyers that the Raven can also be considered as a long distance yacht, rather than just for coastal cruising.

Design

The Ravens longish keel translates into a 1.52m draft with 1425kg of ballast and an overall displacement of 3318kg. It has a long waterline of .84m (29ft), and with its fairly modest beam of 3.2m carried weil aft, the Raven 31 should perform well on downwind legs.

The boat gains its interior space from a wide coach roof which slopes forward virtually all the way to anchor capstan and manages to give the boat a sleek profile while not compromising the interior,

Construction

The Raven 31 is of conventional fibreglass construction using

chopped Strand mat and woven rovings on the hull with the deck of foam sandwich using Klegecell. An internal grid is glassed in and runs the full length of the vessel giving both longitudinal and transverse reinforcement. Inside the grid are timber blocks at extra stress points such as the mast step, keel bolts and engine bed. Plywood blocks are also incorporated in the deck in areas of compression such as where the winches are located, The is available three stages to Australian boatbuyers: stage one is huli and deck bonded with alloy toe rails, hatches, keel, rudder and tiller fitted — and windows supplied (25,416); stage two additions include a Yanmar 15hp engine, kauri bulkheads and fitout, water tank and coaming line fitted (41,442); and stage three includes sails and spars, standing and running rigging, deck gear, pumps and electrics (55,890). (See box for full details),

Deck and rig

With its wide coamings, stowaway traveller track, and removable transom, the Raven 31 cockpit proved both comfortable and functional. The boarding platform, first seen on the Young 88 and Farr 1020 (both Kiwi yachts), is an excellent idea of the cruising lifestyle: swimming. getting out of dinghies and it rading provisions from a dinghy all become very easy with this plation. The traveller track slides i ti , a tube in the port are olovi ti ,

Stowage is in the port seat locker where the is enough space for sails, gas , and fenders, Genoa vvint les on Cool Change were two Maxwell 23s while the winches for the halyards were Barlow 20 and mounted on the Cabin top.

All halyards led back to this position and were controlled by a

Cruising Helmsman's CRUISING BOATS – 11

bevy of jammers. The companionway hatch is trimmed in attractive karri and the timber surrounding for attaching the dodger combined with the timber grab rails, break up the starkness of a fibreglass deck,

Up the bow is a single anchor bollard with a brass capstan and, on Cool Change, an electric winch system. This was installed in anticipation of the South Pacific cruising the boat would be doing before reaching Sydney and the need for all chain rode.

The sloping foredeck and narrow side decks may sometimes make sail changes and deck work generally a bit awkward, but the Raven has good non-skid surface and an easily managed rig to counteract any of these problems. The genoa tracks situated on the side decks are complemented by another set on the coach roof to permit better sheeting angles for windward work and for smaller headsails when the wind pipes up

 

 

 

 

 

,

Empty page scroll down for more


interior

Woolleys above decks compromises pay off down below on the Raven 31 where there is considerable room with a double quarter and chart table to starboard and a Ushaped galley to port. The dinette converts to another double barth which combined with the twin Vee-berths and single settee berth gives sleeping for seven people. Realistically it provides living space for a couple and two children, or two couples.

One good idea worth mentioning is the mast base is enclosed in the head so the inevitable leaks at the collar are not going to matter. Opposite the head is a hanging locker,

The main saloon has the usual stowage under the berths with the 200 litre water tank located under the starboard settee. The galley also has good stowage with two vertical lockers and the ice box under the chart table opposite. There are both hand and foot pumps in the galley, and a two burner Mariner stove and oven,

The Yanmar 15hp engine is located in the conventional place with access through the companionway steps. The stainless steel fuel tank has a capacity of 3G .

Cárange was attractively fitted out in New Zealand kauri though there are teak and mahogany options. Another nice touch is the timber headliner which again is kauri is pleasant.

Ventilation throughout the boat was through a large hatch forward, a medium sized hatch amidships and a mushroom vent over the

Performance

Coo! Changes owner, Alf Goad is

an experienced ocean racing yachtsman having done a number of Sydney-Hobart, Sydney-Noumea and Lord Howe races as well as the regular season racing calendar. He bought the stav en 31 because the idea of a cruising boat which had a fair turn of speed" appealed to him.

Since he took over the boat after the boat show he has sailed it regularly and said he cannot fault its performance.

"We sailed Change up from the harbour to Pittwater in 35 knots and averaged over % knots reaching, then when it swung onto our nose, we were doing % knots, he said,

We had up a No 3 headsail and the boat was heeling 15 degrees.” For the test we sailed Change in a breeze which began at nothing but picked up to 13-15 knots, Notable with llll: Raven was that when there was a puff, the boat accelerated very quickly, With sheets eased in () knots of breeze we were doing .5 knots which reached eigli i at the maximum 15 knots Bolling into the 15 knot wind were averaging seven knots.

The tillering was very easy and it was all exceptionally pleasing experience steering the Raven in the increasing breeze. The Raven has a great deal to offer the novice sailor who missed out on learning to sail in dinghies. Because it responds So well to the helm, and to tweaking, one can easily comprehend the cause and effects of tuning, and because of its modest rig the boat is not intimidating. Yet it's light displacement and quick acceleration promises rewards for doing the right things when sailing the boat,

Under power Change also benefited from its easily driven hull and cruised happily at Six knots at maximum revs for the Yanmar 15hp. Summary

The Raven 31 is 55,890 at stage three and with a list of optional extras, it probably brings the cost of a boat ready for Cruising to about 60,000. For that you would get a versatile vessel which can be sailed short handed but which also would be fun sailing in club races. At the same time you would have a comfortable boat which is capable of long distance or coastal Cruising.

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